Your Reptile and Amphibian Resource and Information Site

Back to Anoles Forum   Forums   Home   Members Area  

Anoles Forum

Coolguy132435   Yexalen   Coolguy132435   TwilightRealm   Coolguy132435   Yexalen   Atrax27407   Coolguy132435   Yexalen   Missy squirrel   Coolguy132435   Peas_on_earth   Prettykttkat   Coolguy132435   Prettykttkat   Coolguy132435   Prettykttkat   Atrax27407   Prettykttkat   Atrax27407   Prettykttkat   Atrax27407   BSG   Prettykttkat   Coolguy132435   Prettykttkat   Atrax27407   JJ Animal Trax   Atrax27407   JJ Animal Trax  
Pages 1 2 Next
 Member  Message

 #1762042


Coolguy132435
View Profile





 Knight Anole Care (For the few of us out there)

Knight Anole Care

Table Of Contents
General Information
Housing
Feeding
Specific Care
Sexing
Breeding




General Information
The Cuban Knight Anole (Anolis equestris) is the largest member of family Polychrotidae (all anoles). The largest estimated size of the knight anole is roughly 19 3/8 inches. There are however, unconfirmed reports of 20- 22 inches, although most of them mature at a much shorter length. Knight Anoles mature quite fast at some surpassing 15 inches within two years. There are 11 recognized subspecies of knight anoles. They are as follows:

.Anolis equestris brujensis
.Anolis equestris buidei
. Anolis equestris cincoleguas
.Anolis equestris cyaneus
.Anolis equestris equestris
.Anolis equestris juraguensis
.Anolis equestris persparsus
.Anolis equestris potior
.Anolis equestris sabinalensis
.Anolis equestris thomasi
.Anolis equestris verreonensis

While there are many subspecies, most if not all that you will see at pet stores are Anolis equestris equestris with subspecies such as Anolis equestris thomasi being much more difficult to locate. The appearance of knight anoles can have quite some variability within their range of color. They can range from light blue, green, yellow, and dark brown to almost black. Like their more common cousins the green anoles (Anolis carolinensis), they can change their color at will based on three layers of chromatophores. Their body is slightly different from more common anoles in that they have a very triangular head with sometimes random spots and lines of color in and around the head. Many knight anoles have a pronounced dorsal crest with spikes. Knight anoles are somewhat more difficult to keep in captivity than Anolis carolinensis or Anolis sagrei. I would not recommend attempting to keep one unless you have some experience with green or brown anoles. They have more needs than other anoles such as large housing and can become stressed more easily. With all of this said, if everything is taken into account for their care requirements, they can make great pets. Be prepared for a longer commitment than with green anoles as they can supposedly live up to 16 years of age.




Housing
Knight anoles require much more space for housing than green or brown anoles. The suggested MINIMUM cage size is 30 gallons per knight anole. If you plan on keeping a single knight anole, I suggest that it is kept in at least a 40 gallon cage. For these animals, try to get a TALL cage rather than LONG as they are arboreal and stay mainly in the lower branches of trees in the wild. There are two possible types of cages that you can use. The first is a typical glass aquarium such as the ones used to house fish. These have many advantages and disadvantages. An advantage is that they are clear so that you can perfectly view your reptile. They also hold heat and humidity fairly well. Some disadvantages are that they aren’t very well ventilated and a screen top is a must. Also, glass blocks nearly all UVB lighting which must be placed on top of the screen cover. Glass aquariums are also rather expensive. The second type of cage that can be used is a mesh cage or reptarium. These can be aluminum screen cages or fine soft mesh screen cages. These are good in that they are very inexpensive and are very well ventilated allowing your knight anole to breath easily. They also don’t block ANY UVB light as long as the lamp has a reflector inside of it. Some disadvantages of mesh cages are the fact that they don’t hold humidity or heat too well. Because of this, the reptile must be misted very frequently (2 to 3 times daily at least). Some say that knight anoles will drink from water bowls (Not all will). Too much misting and the reptile can develop slight respiratory problems. Too little misting, and the reptile will not only be dehydrated, but will have difficulty shedding. This can lead too many problems. If the reptile is unable to shed the skin around its eyes, it may be unable to see prey which may ultimately lead to starvation. The enclosure should also be very visually appealing with many plants, vines, and branches for them to climb on. Below is a complete list of reptile-safe plants that can be placed in the cage.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Abelia
African Daisy
Sweet Alysum
Chamomile
Arbutus
Asperagus Fern
Aster
Baby’s Tears
Bird’s Nest Fern
Boston Fern
Bottle Bush
Bougainvillea
Bridal Veil
Bromeliads
Camellia
Corn Plant
Corn flower-also known as bachelors buttons
Croton
Dracaena
Emerald Ripple
Eugenia
Fuchsia
Geranium
Hen and Chicks Succulent
Hibiscus
Hoya
Ice plant
Japanese aralias
Impatiens
Jade Plant
Jasmine
Lavender
Marigold
Monkey Plant
Mother of Pearl
Natal Plum
Painted nettle
Palms
Pampas Grass
Parlor Palm
Peperomia
Phoenix
Piggyback Plant
Pilea
Pink Polka Dot Plant
Ponytail Plant
Purple Velvet
Spider Plant
Staghorn Fern
Swedish Ivy
Tree Mallow
Umbrella Plant
Velvet Plant
Wandering Jew
Warneckii
Wax Plant
Zebra plant
Zinnias
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Personally, my preference is pothos for live plants, although practically any of the above are suitable for your knight anole. The interior of the cage should have a substrate at the base, potted live or fake plants along the substrate that are tall, possible vines in the cage, and branches. Caves are not necessary but can be visually appealing and may or may not be used by your lizard. There are several acceptable things that can be used as a substrate. The best ones are organic potting soil, organic compost, and peat moss. In rare cases, peat moss has caused respiratory problems in small reptiles, but it should be perfectly fine for your cage. The substrate should be 3 to 5 inches high from the base of the cage. They are not diggers and do not need a deep burrowing substrate. It is acceptable to place 2 to 3 inches of gravel underneath the soil as a drainage system if plants are directly rooted within the substrate, or simply for looks. The plants within the cage should add to the climbing area for the knight anole. Knight anoles can be rather lazy at times and may lay on a branch for hours at a time.

There are several necessary lights for knight anoles to thrive in captivity. First, knight anoles need some form of incandescent lighting. This can be in the form of a day bulb, spot lamp, or any relatively low watt bulb that produces heat. This should be on one side of the cage in a basking spot that is somewhat elevated (This can be something like a branch). This area should be at least 90 degrees Fahrenheit. The ambient temperature in the cage during the day should be in the mid 80s. There should also be a cooler side on the tank. This is a perfect spot to place a UVB light. Knight anoles should have this preferably in the form of a long strip light. It is best to have one that is roughly 5% UVB. This is necessary for diurnal reptiles such as knight anoles to prevent metabolic bone disease (similar to osteoporosis in reptiles). It is sometimes best to have this running the entire length of the cage is possible. It is best to avoid compact UVB bulbs which have been proven to cause eye problems in reptiles. The lights should be on for about 12 to 14 hours daily to emulate subtropical conditions. In the winter, shorten this time to fit that of where you live. Also, the humidity should be somewhere between 65 to 70% at all times. If you live in a place that gets cold during the winter, it is best to use a night light in the form of a red, black, or purple light. These produce little light but some heat for your lizards. Many knight anoles die of the cold conditions in Florida winters.



Feeding
Knight anoles will consume a wide variety of foods if given the chance. Because of their large size, they can eat more things than their green anole cousins. Knight anoles should be fed either everyday or every other day. A good staple of their diet are gut-loaded crickets. These are crickets that have been given food in advance. My knight anole eats anywhere from 6 to 10 crickets every other day with one to three crickets in the days between major feedings plus moths occasionally, and fruits are offered weekly. Although, there isn’t a requirement for a set feeding schedule, there should be some order. Several other good foods include: silkworms, moths, grasshoppers, small feeder fish, mealworms, fruit flies/house flies, earthworms, and adults may be fed pinky mice. If you choose to feed your knight anole a small feeder fish such as a rosy red minnow, make sure that the fish is free of disease and safe to feed. Knight anoles can be fed many wild caught food items that are safe and removed from a pesticide free area. Examples of safe wild caught food items are crickets, grasshoppers, roaches (not household roaches such as the American cockroach), earwigs, may flies, lake flies, dragon flies, damsel flies, termites, cicadas, leafhoppers, aphids, lacewings, ant lions, bee flies, crane flies, and hover flies. Several items are high in fat and should only be offered as treats once or twice a week maximum including wax worms, hornet/bee larvae, and safe caterpillars. Never feed caterpillars with spikes, hairs, etc. as they are irritants and some may even be poisonous. Knight anoles also may consume small amounts of fruit in their diet. Some will eat apple sauce, grapes, peaches, bananas, strawberries, blueberries, and other soft fruits. Adult knight anoles can consume small pinky mice in their diet that may be frozen and then thawed or live. Some people may give them feeder anoles as food. However, I would not recommend this for several reasons. One, I love green anoles as I own several and could not stand to do something such as that. Two, there is a HUGE variety of other foods that they can be fed and it is simply not necessary. And three, while unlikely, a green anole could possibly injure your knight anole in the process of being attacked. Below is a sample table of a possible feeding schedule for your knight anole. It may not suit every knight anole’s needs however.


Possible Feeding Schedule For My Knight Anole

Day of The Week Food Items

Monday 6 Large Dusted Crickets
Tuesday 2 Large Undusted Crickets
Wednesday 6 Large Dusted Crickets
Thursday 2 Large Undusted Crickets
Friday 6 Large Undusted Crickets
Saturday 2 Large Undusted Crickets
Sunday Blueberries, Applesauce, Strawberries, Grapes, etc.






Specific Care

Knight Anoles have somewhat different care needs than that of green anoles. Knight anoles like green anoles do not enjoy being handled, but can be very aggressive. Knight anoles are much more aggressive than green anoles. Their bites can and will draw blood and can be quite painful (More painful supposedly than that of the tokay gecko). UNDER NO CIRCUMSTANCES!!!!, should you house two males together. For a breeding pair of a male and a female I would suggest at least a 65 gallon cage (Bigger is better). If you intend on housing a harem of one male and 2 or more females, I suggest a large custom made cage that is at least three feet wide by three feet long by five feet high. Males can sometimes be violent towards the females within the cage. Females may even be violent towards each other at times. Handling them is best to be avoided entirely, some may be able to be held but they will most likely become quite stressed by it. Knight Anoles SHOULD NOT be kept with any other types of reptiles or amphibians. If it is small it may be eaten by your lizard. In fact, smaller species of anoles such as the green anole and bark anole comprise a small portion of their diet at times in the wild. Because almost all of the knight anoles that you will see in a pet store are wild caught, they may be stressed at first. When I first purchased my knight anole. It didn’t seem to want to eat at all. In fact, it hardly ate anything for about the first two weeks that I had it. Eventually, it became a ravenous eater and devoured many crickets from then on.

Sexing
Sexing the knight anoles is generally the same way as sexing a green anole. To be completely sure, you must check for the two post-anal scales that are only present on males. Males also typically possess two hemi-penal bulges at the base of the tail. Males and females both possess dewlaps. Males tend to have larger/more triangular heads along with larger dewlaps, but it is not an accurate way to sex them.


Breeding
Breeding knight anoles is a little more difficult than breeding green anoles. In the wild, a male knight anole may be with a group of 1 to 3 females. Males are highly territorial and have similar displays of any anole. In captivity, if a female is willing to mate, she will stay on a branch or plant and the male will bite her neck (probably more painful than green anoles‘ mating!!!). If conditions are successful in captivity, they may mate. Typically, about a month after breeding, the female will lay an egg under soil that she digs. She will lay a new egg about every week or so. Unlike green anoles, the incubation period can be over two months. The babies hatch out at about 5 inches each. Within two years, they can surpass a size of 15 inches.

Disclaimer
Not having a huge amount of experience with knight anoles, not all of the information is from my own personal knowledge. I have compiled some information from various online sources and with the permission of the people that I know that keep/breed knight anoles. If you are considering to purchase a Cuban Knight Anole I would advise you to consult this and many other care sheets in order to find as much information as possible.



~~~~Chase Leinart aka coolguy132435~~~~



06/15/08  07:50pm

 #1763497


Yexalen
View Profile



  Message To: Coolguy132435   In reference to Message Id: 1762042


 Knight Anole Care (For the few of us out there)

Just curious about the plant list... where did you get it? Are they all tropical climate plants? Or just ALL plants of all climates??

I am looking into other plants for one of my lizards and never heard of many of those being on a "safe list" of tropical plants....

just curious...



06/16/08  11:48pm

 #1763851


Coolguy132435
View Profile



  Message To: Yexalen   In reference to Message Id: 1763497


 Knight Anole Care (For the few of us out there)

to be honest, i dont remember exactly where i got it from. I remeber searching on google for reptile safe plants list and that came up as a list of plants that a guy uses or suggests for veiled chameleons. Naturally, i assumed that for the most part what would work for chameleons would work for anoles overall.



06/17/08  01:02pm

 #1763856


TwilightRealm
View Profile



  Message To: Coolguy132435   In reference to Message Id: 1763851


 Knight Anole Care (For the few of us out there)

I’m not sure it would be safe to assume that. Do veiled chameleons drink their water in the form of droplets on the plants, like anoles?



06/17/08  01:06pm

 #1764135


Coolguy132435
View Profile



  Message To: TwilightRealm   In reference to Message Id: 1763856


 Knight Anole Care (For the few of us out there)

yes...veiled chameleons like anoles almost never drink from water bowls



06/17/08  05:31pm

 #1767996


Yexalen
View Profile



  Message To: Coolguy132435   In reference to Message Id: 1764135


 Knight Anole Care (For the few of us out there)

hmm.... I am always looking for safe tropical plants for my water dragons and can never find a list anywhere near that long.... I will look it up and double check to be sure.



06/20/08  09:15pm

 #1768451


Atrax27407
View Profile



  Message To: Yexalen   In reference to Message Id: 1767996


 Knight Anole Care (For the few of us out there)

Actually, any (or alnost any) plant that thrives in low light conditions will serve for ANY SPECIES of Anole. The only caveat is that, for large species like the Knight Anole, it is best to use more robust species of plant. That is because of their large size, larger species of Anoles will destroy fragile plants over time. Oh yes, you can also use various species of Diffenbachia as well. Just make sure to avoid plant species with milky colored sap - they are usually toxic to some degree.



06/21/08  11:32am

 #1768492


Coolguy132435
View Profile



  Message To: Atrax27407   In reference to Message Id: 1768451


 Knight Anole Care (For the few of us out there)

good point....i have pretty large and strong plants in my cage becuase the knight anole walks all over them daily



06/21/08  12:26pm

 #1775247


Yexalen
View Profile



  Message To: Coolguy132435   In reference to Message Id: 1768492


 Knight Anole Care (For the few of us out there)

There are just a lot of toxic plants out there...

With my water dragon I have to be careful because i only known of a few that can hold up to his weight, his claws, and that are non toxic.

The anoles aren’t much of a problem to buy plants for. Any non toxic one works ha ha



06/27/08  04:24am

 #1777634


Missy squirrel
View Profile



  Message To: Yexalen   In reference to Message Id: 1775247


 Knight Anole Care (For the few of us out there)

Hi i have an anole and the male bites the females neck when the green anoles breed too!!



06/29/08  03:13pm

 #1834195


Coolguy132435
View Profile



  Message To: Missy squirrel   In reference to Message Id: 1777634


 Knight Anole Care (For the few of us out there)

bump



08/17/08  07:09pm

 #1834433


Peas_on_earth
View Profile



  Message To: Coolguy132435   In reference to Message Id: 1834195


 Knight Anole Care (For the few of us out there)

It’s funny that most everyone has told me anoles never drink from standing water...all of mine drink from standing water. I do mist several times a day and they do drink frm droplets, but in the mornings after they eat, they’ll go to the waterbowl and have a drink.



08/17/08  10:43pm

 #1929016


Prettykttkat
View Profile



  Message To: Coolguy132435   In reference to Message Id: 1762042


 Knight Anole Care (For the few of us out there)

I just came across your care sheet and it looks pretty good. I also have been reading other posts on here and am surprised to see that most people think that Knight Anoles don’t enjoy being handled. I currently have a pair that I raised as babies, they are now 3 years old. They love to come out and be held! My female is especially out going as she will jump out of a fake ficus tree I have in my living room (It’s about 6 ft tall) onto people that walk by. She also runs to me while in her cage and tries to get out so I will hold her. If I don’t take her out she climbs up to the screen lid and hangs upsidedown. She is very smart, she does this because she knows I will always get her out then because she is so pathetic looking lol! The male is more laid back and loves to just chill out on a shoulder or on top of someone’s head. Both will eat and drink out of my hand. I have also taken them to schools and public places and they love the attention and never try to run or bite. They will go to anyone and like being stroked under the chin. Captive bred babies are definetly the way to go if you want them this tame. Wild caught knight anoles can become friendly too but it takes awhile for them to trust you and alot of patience. I used to catch them as a kid, play with them, watch them, teach them tricks, feed them and then release them back into my yard. After they were tame they would stay in my yard and let me go up to them and pick them up without running away. They would also eat out of my hand. So my conclusion is that Knight anoles can be tamed and like being held once they are. If you have one of these awesome lizards and never hold it I feel sorry for you and your lizard for all the enjoyment you are missing out on! :)



01/09/09  01:45pm

 #1929080


Coolguy132435
View Profile



  Message To: Prettykttkat   In reference to Message Id: 1929016


 Knight Anole Care (For the few of us out there)

Almost all knight anoles dislike being handled. If it attempts to run, it can almost be said to be a better thing. Mine no longer flares her dewlap when i put my hand in the cage, but i still wouldn’t stress her out with handling. Captive knights are nearly impossible to find as far as i’ve seen. I do have breeding plans, but i have enough reptiles presently so i’ll avoid getting a male for a couple years. In response to what you said, i have no problem not handling my knight anole. I’m fascinated enough by it as it is and i don’t feel that she gains any enthusiasm from me holding her. But i guess they’re all different.



01/09/09  03:20pm

 #1929633


Prettykttkat
View Profile



  Message To: Coolguy132435   In reference to Message Id: 1929080


 Knight Anole Care (For the few of us out there)

You keep your Knight alone? I wonder how she would be once you introduced a male? I know that mine are pretty much inseparable. But that might be because they were raised together. I got the female first and then a month later got my male. About a year ago I tried to put her in a seprate cage because she was gravid and I wanted to be able to get her egg as soon as she layed it without have to dig through all the substrate of my 75 tank. Imediately they both got depressed. They hid in the plants in the dark side of the tank, wouldn’t eat, and were not active. I took my male out after several days and put him in with the female and they both returned to normal. They also sleep together and are often seen during the day ontop of each other. They also follow each other out of the cage and when my female comes out of her cage the male always has to come out too. They remind me of love birds lol! I wonder if introduced as adults they would act the same way?

Do you ever take yours out and let her run around? If you don’t like to hold her you could get her a tree to sit in like mine have. I know in the wild they are active and like to run around in big trees, that’s why I take mine out. I feel bad if I leave them in a cage all day.



01/10/09  02:07pm

 #1929670


Coolguy132435
View Profile



  Message To: Prettykttkat   In reference to Message Id: 1929633


 Knight Anole Care (For the few of us out there)

Yeah, i keep her alone because anoles are almost never caring. My cage isn’t large enough for a tree, but she has a plethora of large plants presently. Like i said though, she would become stressed if taken out and i think she has plenty of room to run around in her cage.



01/10/09  03:30pm

 #1929683


Prettykttkat
View Profile



  Message To: Coolguy132435   In reference to Message Id: 1929670


 Knight Anole Care (For the few of us out there)

I don’t think I agree with you about them being uncaring. Maybe that’s true for small anoles but Knights are bigger making them smarter and more aware. My Knights have alot more personality than most of the lizards I keep. They are very social and interactive with each other and with me, my husband and my kids.



01/10/09  03:52pm

 #1929699


Atrax27407
View Profile



  Message To: Prettykttkat   In reference to Message Id: 1929683


 Knight Anole Care (For the few of us out there)

Just because A. equestris is a larger species, they are not by default smarter than a smaller species. Anoles are reptiles. Their purpose in life is to eat, survive, and make more Anoles. Assigning them human characteristics is no more valid than assigning human characteristics to a rock. Anoles congregate together because it is the preferred basking or sleeping area in the enclosure - not because they are fond of each other. They approach a human simply because the human is warmer than the surroundings. The limit of their thought process is associating the opening of an enclosure top with the introduction of feeders. They will forget it just as easily. They are governed by instinct not feelings or any great cognitive thinking.
They maybe interesting to watch because of their instinctive behaviors, but they do not have any great capacity for either thought or emotion. Their keepers simply assign their perceptions and experiences to them.



01/10/09  04:36pm

 #1929785


Prettykttkat
View Profile



  Message To: Atrax27407   In reference to Message Id: 1929699


 Knight Anole Care (For the few of us out there)

Your funny. I’m not saying they have the feelings or emotions of a human. But you are very wrong in what your saying. You obviously don’t interact with this species. I have since I was a child. I have observed them in the wild and as captives. In captivity I have noticed my pair get "depressed" if seperated from each other. This is not uncommon for larger species. I have also witnessed this with savanah monitors and iguanas. Sometimes if lizards are are kept by themselves and they are held by the owner alot they bond with them and can become "depressed" when they are sold or given away to someone else. By depressed I mean not eating, lethargic, hiding, unactive. If they don’t have feelings then why do my Knights get depressed if I seperate them? If they care nothing for each other then why when I have them out of the cage they follow each other everywhere? When they are in thier cage they are also always together and sleep together. When I open their cage why do they jump on me to get out? I don’t have food, they know the crickets are in the cage not on my shoulder where they sit. Why do they jump on people who walk by them when they are loose in my house? They don’t have food, they arent any warmer than the cage which they could jump into at any time. They have a choice but they choose people over the food and the heat in thier cage. By the way showing this type of behavior ( being social, showing feelings by getting depressed, etc.) is a sign of intellegence.



01/10/09  06:22pm

 #1929832


Atrax27407
View Profile



  Message To: Prettykttkat   In reference to Message Id: 1929785


 Knight Anole Care (For the few of us out there)

You have no idea what you are talking about. Anoles are solitary by nature except during breeding season and they certainly don’t get depressed. They don’t form attachments with other Anoles, humans or any other creatures.
Following your other logic, pythons are more intelligent that Knight Anoles and a Stegosaurus woiuld be smarter than a human since they are larger. Nothing you have said coincides with the normal behavior of Anoles. You can believe whatever romanticized notions that you want to believe. Reptiles simply are not social animals.



01/10/09  07:21pm

 #1930015


Prettykttkat
View Profile



  Message To: Atrax27407   In reference to Message Id: 1929832


 Knight Anole Care (For the few of us out there)

You are SO wrong. For example Veiled Chameleons are not social, why? How do I know? Veileds will not tolerate each other at all unless its mating time which can last up to 24 hrs and then after that they go back to being solitary. If you ever tried to house them together one will kill the other. Anoles are social, why? How do I know? Because they can be housed together and have a hierarchy. What is a hierarchy? Its a SOCIAL structure where there is a dominate party and pecking order as follows. Just the fact that they can live together should be your first clue that they are not solitary animals. Its also apparent you do not have alot of experience keeping other reptiles besides green anoles. The things I speak of are from my own experience and the experience of others. If you read what I posted earlier you will see how I talk of my anoles getting depressed when seperated. As for other lizards, I used to have a pair of savannah monitors. They were kept together for 2 years and one day I came home and found them mating. Before that I didnt know I had a male and female as they are impossible to tell apart. While they were kept together they acted very similar to my Knights as far as wanting to be together alot and sleeping together. One day my male climbed up the side of the cage which was very tall and long, it used to be an old jewelry showcase, he fell and broke a rib that punctured his lung and he died the next day. The female was sleeping on top of him the morning I noticed that he died. I took him out and brought him to a vet who told me how he died because I didnt know and I wanted to make sure he wasnt sick. That first week the female paced her cage non stop looking for him. After that week she became lethargic and stopped eating. I took her to the vet and they said nothing was wrong with her. I had to force feed her to keep her alive for about a month until she started eating on her own again. She was never the same after that. I eventually decided to give her to my friend who had another savannah she could be with. She currently is doing fine and is happy with the other monitor. Another example is when I was a kid I had an iguana. Raised him from a baby and held him every day for hours. If I was home he was out of his cage basically. I got sick and had to be hospitalized for two months. My mother told me he stopped eating and was lethargic. I got very upset but what could I do? Nothing. My mom tried everything she could but he wouldnt eat. He died while I was in the hospital. A few months ago I was talking to someone at the petstore I go to who told me the same thing happened to him when he left home to join the Army. His iguana stopped eating and died. In all these situations there was proper husbandry and no sign of illness. These examples are enough to conclude that some reptiles do get "depressed" but you can think what you want. I can tell you are not a very open minded person and already have your mind made up about what you think you know.



01/10/09  11:58pm

 #1930237


Atrax27407
View Profile



  Message To: Prettykttkat   In reference to Message Id: 1930015


 Knight Anole Care (For the few of us out there)

Anoles are not social animals. They do not exist in cohesive communities but rather a group of exclusive territories. A male will have a territory that encompasses the territories of 2-6 females. He will defend his territory to the death against other males and, in fact, spends most of his time patrolling the borders against incursions from other males. Females compete for territory among themselves. The most dominant gets the best territory. They are exclusive territories and each female will drive out any others that trespass. The only interaction that they have except during mating season is to defend their territory. The fact is, they are solitary for almost all of the year. If you observe them in the wild, you will find that the females avoid the males during all but breeding season. One male per territory and one female per territory. If they are social, try keeping two males in the same enclosure - or even two females. Keeping Anoles (or other reptiles) together in an enclosure is an artificial environment. Basking and resting areas are limited and they may cluster around these because of the limited resources and relatively high population density. If there is not enough space for the males or females to establish and defend a territory, they will co-exist but eventually fight That is one reason they are shipped in confined spaces - it cuts down on injuries due to fighting due to the inability to establish a territory.
I hope your over-romaticized view of your reptiles doesn’t compromise their health. You are clearly trying to assign human characteristics to reptiles. Reptiles in general, and specifically Anoles are not touchy, feely pets.
Oh yes, I have volumes and volumes of empiric research to back up what I post besides 40+ years of experience.



01/11/09  12:04pm

 #1930282


BSG
View Profile



  Message To: Atrax27407   In reference to Message Id: 1930237


 Knight Anole Care (For the few of us out there)

After reading all the post here (and other post you have left on this forum) today... It has come to my attention that you may have 40+ years experience... but it’s at being a !!!!!!!!!!! Guess you just can’t Handel someone (especially a women) knowing more then you do! I would love to have a list of everyone you have talked to about this girls post... IE: Vet Friends and who ever and NCU. I bet you haven’t talked to ANYONE!!!! You are just being a jerk!



01/11/09  01:15pm

 #1930666


Prettykttkat
View Profile



  Message To: Atrax27407   In reference to Message Id: 1930237


 Knight Anole Care (For the few of us out there)

You obviously have a problem comprehending what you read. I’ll try again to get through to you. Read slowly. I’m not saying that they have any sort of feelings like a human being. Human beings are very complex. These are lizards we are talking about here. Like I said before a animal that is not social in any way cannot tolerate each other at all except at breeding time. Example is the Veiled chameleon. Even in captivity they cannot be with each other or they will kill each other. Anoles can be housed together and demonstrate social behavior towards one another as stated in my previous post and even by you in your last post. As far as everything else goes I think you need to re read what I wrote previously because I’m not going to keep rewriting everything because you are slow, its to much of a waste of time. Also reading about them isn’t the same as hands on observation. Just because you researched them in a book and have kept one species of lizard 40+ years doesn’t mean you know more than me, a person who has studied them in the wild for years. I have also done my fair share of research myself. For you to question the health of my animals is just ridiculous and shows how threatened you are of me because I am more knowledgeable than you are about reptiles.

I also see the way you talk to other people as well, you always talk down to them. Get over yourself and get a clue.



01/11/09  09:20pm

 #1930687


Coolguy132435
View Profile



  Message To: Prettykttkat   In reference to Message Id: 1930666


 Knight Anole Care (For the few of us out there)

This is too much for me. Dude, know when someone is on a way higher level than you. That’s the problem with these forums. Too many over confident beginners such as yourself drive away anyone of professional experience. Use your head. If someone has studied and kept a species longer than the amount of time that you’ve been alive, they just might know what they’re talking about. In what way have you demonstrated any knowledgeability above that of an absolute beginner to reptiles. By suggesting coca cola as a treatment for prolapses? By questioning my care methods for knight anoles as well as suggesting that they should be handled to become tame? Any professional hobbyist would be glad to tell you that the opposite applies to small reptiles.



01/11/09  09:43pm

 #1930765


Prettykttkat
View Profile



  Message To: Coolguy132435   In reference to Message Id: 1930687


 Knight Anole Care (For the few of us out there)

Just because you read that somewhere doesn’t make it true. Just because someone says something it doesn’t make it true. You have to experience things yourself to really know the truth. If someone keeps an animal in a cage and never socializes with it, it doesnt matter how many years they have kept that animal. They still know absolutely nothing about handling the animal and socializing with it. Just because you read about an animal in the wild doesn’t mean you are an expert. Try observing it yourself in the wild. Animals do behave differently in captivity than they do in the wild as they also behave differently to different people who keep them. I’m certainly not a beginner by any means as I have been keeping herps practically my whole life. I was born in FL and grew up with lizards and other herps in my back yard. When I was growing up if I didn’t know something and couldn’t find the answer through research I’d ask my Aunt who has worked in several zoos in the education dept. I also used to help out at the zoo in the summer. I got to see how to take care of alot of animals not just herps. In school I took care of all the animals in the biology dept every day. Most were reptiles. As a kid and as an adult I have kept, bred, tamed, fostered and rehabbed all types of herps captive and wild.



01/12/09  12:09am

 #2017762


Atrax27407
View Profile



  Message To: Prettykttkat   In reference to Message Id: 1930765


 Knight Anole Care (For the few of us out there)

Bump



06/07/09  10:33am

 #2018694


JJ Animal Trax
View Profile



  Message To: Atrax27407   In reference to Message Id: 2017762


 Knight Anole Care (For the few of us out there)

Thanks for posting this care sheet, coolguy.

I know this discussion is old, but i feel very strongly about this matter. The male and female cka’s that i work with are sociable and do enjoy being handled. I agree completely with Prettykttkat in that they are sociable and intelligent. And i have no doubt about her stories of the iggys and sav monitors. These guys are much smarter than we give them credit.

For the arguement that lizards are smart and can enjoy human contact watch this video:

http://www.siscoreptiles.com/tegu-attention.php


They are tegus, but keep in mind they have food and heat, yet they still flock to the human to be petted.



06/08/09  05:02pm

 #2021955


Atrax27407
View Profile



  Message To: JJ Animal Trax   In reference to Message Id: 2018694


 Knight Anole Care (For the few of us out there)

You are comparing "apples to oranges". Tegus, Bearded Dragons. etc. are not available for importation into the US and have not been for quite some time. The result is that almost 100% of them that you find in the pet trade are CB (Captive bred) and have been CB for many generations. What does this mean? To start, they have never had to deal with predators or find their own food and they have become used to associating with human beings and depending on humans for food (like any animal that loses its fear of man). They are also higher in their natural food chain than many other reptiles. They are also more robust and tolerate handling much better than smaller species.
Anoles, on the other hand, are 99% WC (wild caught) and not habituated to human contact. Even the larger species view almost anything of equal or greater size as a potential predator. They are accustomed to fleeing from predators and will do so whenever possible. They are less robust and do not tolerate handling. All of them will bite! With the smaller species, it is inconsequential but larger species (like A. equistris) can bit severely enough to draw blood - even as a juvenile.
If you want a "lap lizard", one that you can handle, get a Tegu, Beardie or other larger, more robust animal.



06/14/09  08:11am

 #2022079


JJ Animal Trax
View Profile



  Message To: Atrax27407   In reference to Message Id: 2021955


 Knight Anole Care (For the few of us out there)

i agree completely, but all i’m saying is that someone who works with these guys allot can have a tame one even though the species is overall a flighty species.



06/14/09  11:56am
Pages 1 2 Next


Back to Anoles Forum   Forums   Home   Members Area