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 #2039508


Pinkribbonangel
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 Look at my male and female fence lizard..I think that’s what they are..

We caught the female today, have had the male for a few weeks, he has been eating good and pooping as well. we feed him grasshoppers, moths, beetles, and crickets. He loves the moths.. The lady is still a little shy but I’m sure she will come around..as you see in the photos she has no blue under her.. only orange.. He has bright blue stripes and it’s surrounded with black. It’s a clear difference. Hopefully you can see all my photos.. I have video too, but may take me longer to post.. I caught him on video eating a moth...wondering with her fat belly if she could have eggs in there, but I guess it’s too late for that. I think he is her baby, so I wonder how that works if they breed? We found them in the same place..fence lizards



07/14/09  11:48pm

 #2039515


Pinkribbonangel
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  Message To: Pinkribbonangel   In reference to Message Id: 2039508


 Look at my male and female fence lizard..I think that’s what they are..

BTW to view the photos of them, you have to click on the link at the end of my post called
"fence lizards" I had lots of photos so just uploaded them to photobucket..



07/15/09  12:12am

 #2039521


Jared T
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  Message To: Pinkribbonangel   In reference to Message Id: 2039515


 Look at my male and female fence lizard..I think that’s what they are..

You’re in Georgia? Looks to be an eastern fence lizard.

I have three females. One just laid eggs today, and I’m actually waiting on another to lay her clutch. So not too late. Eggs look like lemon drops bulging out of her hind sides. On younger females they’re a little hard to see, but on adults they’re easier to see. For example, my gravid eastern fence lizard, she’s obviously the brown lizard, but if you look, you can see two bulges on her side, towards her hind leg. Those would be two eggs....

http://i49.photobucket.com/albums/f273/JWT-Designs/100_0955.jpg
Link


’Incest’ breeding I’ve heard as side effects, just not totally sure upon whether or not it’s a true fact.



07/15/09  01:06am

 #2039903


Pinkribbonangel
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  Message To: Jared T   In reference to Message Id: 2039521


 Look at my male and female fence lizard..I think that’s what they are..

yes in GA, thanks, , I think mine has those too, I’ll try to upload more photos later. Can I just leave the eggs in the cage with them? thanks



07/15/09  06:13pm

 #2039945


Jared T
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  Message To: Pinkribbonangel   In reference to Message Id: 2039903


 Look at my male and female fence lizard..I think that’s what they are..

No no no. I would suggest getting a ten gallon tank, and filling the bottom with moist vermiculite. And keeping it moist till she lays them. Once she lays them, you need to move them to an incubator of some sort, either a store bought or home made. Two of my females laid eggs yesterday and today. After they lay them all, you can sure see the difference in size. You can google DIY incubator for ideas on an incubator. Keep eggs at 82 degrees, 92% humidity. If eggs are laid in a dry substrate and left in tank, they will shrivel up like raisins, dry and die. If they’re not fertile they won’t get any bigger in size during incubation. Right now I have 17 eggs incubation, only 11 look good. But we’ll see! You can also browse the fence lizard forums for more incubation and husbandry tips!



07/15/09  07:40pm

 #2040017


Jared T
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  Message To: Jared T   In reference to Message Id: 2039945


 Look at my male and female fence lizard..I think that’s what they are..

You seen my before shot of her holding eggs in the last picture I showed you. Here she is after she laid..



May be a tad blurry, but here’s the link for full size viewing.. Link



07/15/09  09:41pm

 #2040088


Pinkribbonangel
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  Message To: Jared T   In reference to Message Id: 2039945


 Look at my male and female fence lizard..I think that’s what they are..

I don’t have a place to put her like that... can’t I just find the eggs and then put them into an incubator, I don’t have that either but I remember from my childhood to put foil into a styrophome (spelling?) cooler and a low watt light bulb...turning them not sure about reptiles but with ducks you had to turn them..
PS: Is it normal for her to not eat for a few days after catching? She won’t eat, but it’s hard to tell cause there are two now..so maybe she is.
Also I have mealworms in there for a week in a dish with oatmeal, and noone seems to care about them, they are still alive, but they would rather eat the krickets and moths I put in there. I bought the mealworms so I am not sure what to do with the remaining.. thanks.



07/15/09  10:48pm

 #2040098


Jared T
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  Message To: Pinkribbonangel   In reference to Message Id: 2040088


 Look at my male and female fence lizard..I think that’s what they are..

Reptiles are different I think. You can’t turn them at all, and I think they take twice as long to incubate, 55-65 days. You could use a cooler, and a light, but you’ll have to make it to where it keeps humidity, and a certain temp. Maybe within a few degrees. Foil I’m not so sure about. Eggs need to be put in moist(not wet) vermiculite for the incubation process. It’s also good to have moist vermiculite in the cage just in case you do not get to the eggs in time. It keeps them from drying out and dying.

My lizards took a couple days to eat. It takes adjusting I guess, some lizards take four days, maybe six, while some take none.

Mealworms aren’t a good food for fence lizards. I’ve heard they are, and then I’ve heard they aren’t. I choose to NOT feed them mealworms because of the risks I’ve heard. I feed mine crickets and grasshoppers. Some times house flies.



07/15/09  11:05pm

 #2040106


Pinkribbonangel
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  Message To: Jared T   In reference to Message Id: 2040098


 Look at my male and female fence lizard..I think that’s what they are..

Ok I will get rid of the mealworms, the first one loved the crickets, grasshoppers and moths, so I will stick to that.. as far as "vermiculite" I have coconut fiber expandable bedding from petsmart from all living things..do I need something else? Also why can’t I leave them in there? will the lizards eat them eggs?



07/15/09  11:18pm

 #2040111


Jared T
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  Message To: Pinkribbonangel   In reference to Message Id: 2040106


 Look at my male and female fence lizard..I think that’s what they are..

I’m not sure about coconut fiber. I guess if it holds moisture it will work.

The lizards may eat them. They may walk all over them and kill the embryos if the eggs are exposed. The eggs may even dry out if humidity isn’t kept well.



07/15/09  11:22pm

 #2040458


Pinkribbonangel
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  Message To: Jared T   In reference to Message Id: 2040111


 Look at my male and female fence lizard..I think that’s what they are..

thanks, actually her lower half does have that indent so I am thinking she laid them, I just cleaned the cage out cause one of the moths laid eggs and I didn’t want baby caterpillers..anyway I didn’t see anything that looked like a little egg. but she still looks fat and a little bumpy so I can’t tell..

yes the coconut fiber stays moist, actually better than dirt. It comes compressed and you add water to make it expand, then it stays moist, but I also mist the cage... the cage is kept around 80 degrees and about 60-80% humidity.. is that ok? thanks



07/16/09  03:21pm

 #2040463


Jared T
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  Message To: Pinkribbonangel   In reference to Message Id: 2040458


 Look at my male and female fence lizard..I think that’s what they are..

You don’t want to keep the eggs in the tank. I’ve said it too many times now I believe.

Keeping the eggs in the tank is like throwing them out. If it wasn’t, then all of us herpers wouldn’t be investing in either making an incubator, or even buying one.

You risk the eggs getting walked on, ate, molded, dried out, and all sorts with leaving them in the tank. You can leave them in the tank if you choose, but my opinion is to NOT leave them in the tank if you want a successful hatch.



07/16/09  03:31pm

 #2040470


Pinkribbonangel
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  Message To: Jared T   In reference to Message Id: 2040463


 Look at my male and female fence lizard..I think that’s what they are..

thanks so how do I find them and can you give me the easiest way to make an incubator? Also can I use the same stuff I have in the bottom of the tank and can you give me some instructions on how to care for the eggs..thanks again, btw, I am not totally convinced she is even pregnant.



07/16/09  03:41pm

 #2040495


Jared T
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  Message To: Pinkribbonangel   In reference to Message Id: 2040470


 Look at my male and female fence lizard..I think that’s what they are..

Eggs are quite small, probably 3/8’s of an inch by a 1/4 inch. Here are 9 of my eggs in incubation, in a sandwich tupperware container after I moved them. Link



When she lays them, if she lays them, she will either lay them on top of the cage bedding, or she will dig herself into the bedding and lay them. or she might lay them on top of the bedding, and decide to bury them by kicking the substrate on them.

If when the time comes, use new bedding in a tupperware container, make sure your hands are clean to prevent mold during incubation. With clean hands moist the substrate and place it in the container. Moist means soaking it down with water and squeezing it out with one hand to get rid of the total wetness. I would really suggest using perlite or even vermiculite. True value sells it, wal-mart, any where basically. It’s like 12 bucks for a large bag. and it’s in the gardening department. Make sure it’s all sterile with no added chemicals. Remove the eggs with very clean hands and put them in the container. Do not turn, rotate, or change their natural position when moving and setting them in the container for incubation. Bury 2/3 of the egg, leaving the top 1/3 for viewing and checking on. If the eggs are fertile and good they should swell within days.

If I was to make an incubator, I would spend about fifty bucks on it, between the cooler, the heating element, the water trays, and the thermostat. So instead of making one, I spent I think 70 bucks for one delivered to my door. From LLLreptile.com. That even includes the digital therm/humidity gauge. Hova-bator incubators!

If you want to know how to make an incubator, google DIY incubator. DIY means do it yourself.

It would be a good idea to set the incubator up days before you have eggs. That way it’s all set and ready for when you have them. Mine was set up and incubating nothing for weeks before I even got the eggs. I have mine set at 82 degrees, and it’s at about 88% humidity. Ever so often you could open the incubator so that new air goes in. Just not too often. I believe this will help prevent the eggs molding. During the 55 day incubation process, do not touch or rotate the eggs. and try to not bump the incubator in any way.

I’m not sure if you read the other fence lizard topics or not, but you should. They are very informative.



07/16/09  04:31pm

 #2040525


Pinkribbonangel
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  Message To: Jared T   In reference to Message Id: 2040495


 Look at my male and female fence lizard..I think that’s what they are..

thanks for all the info....:)

let me ask you something though, if they were out in the wild, how could they survive? what if it’s not warm enough at night or humid enough daytime?



07/16/09  05:10pm

 #2040529


Jared T
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  Message To: Pinkribbonangel   In reference to Message Id: 2040525


 Look at my male and female fence lizard..I think that’s what they are..

In the wild the mothers lay they eggs in a particular spot. They spend days looking for this spot. They sense the temp and the humidity. They also bury the eggs in the wild, as for they do sometimes in captive.

In the wild the mothers lay the eggs and leave them behind and never look back. When using this method in an enclosure, it’s possible the mother could damage the eggs within the fifty five day incubation process because she doesn’t have as much space to roam around as she does in the wild.



07/16/09  05:15pm

 #2040532


Jared T
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  Message To: Jared T   In reference to Message Id: 2040529


 Look at my male and female fence lizard..I think that’s what they are..

I’m not sure if my last post is true or not. But it sounds so legit! lol



07/16/09  05:21pm

 #2040590


Pinkribbonangel
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  Message To: Jared T   In reference to Message Id: 2040532


 Look at my male and female fence lizard..I think that’s what they are..

thanks again, makes perfect sense..
btw, she has crawled below and is resting on the soil below, (hiding out under rocks and driftwood) rather than roosting on top under the lamp.. she has been there for about an hour or so..do you think she could be laying eggs? Will she bury them? is that moist coconut fiber good to put the eggs in later. thanks:)



07/16/09  07:09pm

 #2040597


Pinkribbonangel
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  Message To: Jared T   In reference to Message Id: 2040532


 Look at my male and female fence lizard..I think that’s what they are..

Also, if she does lay them in the cage, can I put them in a small tuperwear bowl in that soil stuff and put them back in there till I get an incubator set up, how long will they last before they die? thanks

PS: what does the temp and humidity need to be for them to hatch...



07/16/09  07:24pm

 #2040648


Jared T
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  Message To: Pinkribbonangel   In reference to Message Id: 2040597


 Look at my male and female fence lizard..I think that’s what they are..

I feel like I’m beating myself over the head with a ping pong ball racket.

May I ask, how old are you?



07/16/09  08:58pm

 #2040692


Pinkribbonangel
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  Message To: Jared T   In reference to Message Id: 2040648


 Look at my male and female fence lizard..I think that’s what they are..

probably older than you... sorry for all the questions but we are just new to this..my kids are having fun taking care of the lizards...and I think it would be neat to let them witness some babies hatching from eggs. We would probably just let them go, if that’s safe for them... I will look into that too..



07/16/09  10:04pm

 #2040705


Jared T
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  Message To: Pinkribbonangel   In reference to Message Id: 2040692


 Look at my male and female fence lizard..I think that’s what they are..

Probably older than me huh? lol

This is like McDonalds, okay maybe not. How’s that go? I’m lovin’ it? lol

When it comes to eggs refer to my previous posts and or other topics in the fence lizard forum.

I’ve told you what I know, and the proper way of incubation.

Embryos in the egg grow by the humidity penetrating through the egg shell. Without warmth and constant humidity, they will not survive. They need humidity to grow!

With that said and everything else said, the decision is up to you with what you do with the eggs. There is enough wisdom on this topic for you to get a successful hatch.

I’ve learned most of what I know from ’experienced’ friends on this site(thanks everyone!), google searches, and common sense. I don’t mind sharing information with people, but when it comes to similar questions with similar answers it gets old answering them over again. Not trying to be stubborn here, just trying to be honest.

P.S.

I would suggest getting a bigger tank for your two lizards. At least twenty gallons of space PER lizard. Throwing two lizards in anything smaller is like throwing an innocent human being in prison. It isn’t nice.



07/16/09  10:46pm


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