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 #1699066


Kowiiya
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 HELP, ODD BUMP??

Ok, so Im new as some of you know, just got Matty Roh a couple of weeks ago. When I got her I noticed that her tail looked like it had been smashed cuz it has a little bump, but it appears to be fine, cuz the color after the bump is good, and has been good, but the bump Im actually more concerned about is this bumb by her one hind leg--what do you think it is?
The first 2 pics are just cute pics of her, the 3rd pic is a pic of the bump Im worried about, its near her right back leg, and it protrudes a little bit--no discoloration though.






04/11/08  03:32pm

 #1699095


Cphill58
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  Message To: Kowiiya   In reference to Message Id: 1699066


 HELP, ODD BUMP??

If you think your lizard has calcium deficiency (Metabolic Bone Disease- MBD) :
Signs and Symptoms of MBD
Signs of metabolic bone disease include hard knobs in the long bones of the legs, bumps along the vertebral column of the back and tail, softening or hard swelling of the jaw, and softening of the plastron or carapace in turtles and tortoises. All of these signs may be felt before they can be seen, making a careful physical exam important. Visible signs of moderate to severe MBD include jerky gait when walking, tremors and twitches in the limbs and muscles of the legs and toes when at rest, and shakiness when being held.

A common finding is a pliable mandible or maxillae - the jaw bones. This is the best evaluated with the mouth held open. To do this gently restrain the upper jaw and pull down on the dewlap with the other hand. Once the mouth is open, apply gentle posterior (behind) pressure (not lateral (side)) to the mandible, then the maxillae, with the index finger. Normally these bones should feel like solid bone; in small lizards the mandible may give a little laterally but should still feel solid. With MBD either jaw may feel pliable. As MBD worsens, posterior traction from the lower jaw musculature may foreshorten the mandible and an under bite develops. This is often aggravated by fibrous osteodystrophy that bows the mandible laterally.

Juvenile lizards often retain the rounded infantile skull shape of hatchlings because the skull fails to grow and lengthen.

Advanced cases of MBD include all the above signs plus anorexia and fractured bones. Severely deficient reptiles tend to be lethargic and may only be able to drag themselves along the ground. A reptile lacking the ability to lift it’s body from the ground when sitting or walking often suffers from a moderate to severe case of MBD. Arboreal lizards spend all of their time on the ground as they lack the strength to grip and climb.

The earliest and most consistent sign of MBD is partial to complete lack of truncal lifting. A normal iguana lifts its body or trunk, and proximal tail, off the ground while walking or if disturbed. Early in the course of MBD, an iguana drags its pelvis and tail along the ground while walking, yet is still able to lift the front half of it’s body. As MBD progresses, the lizard drags the entire trunk while walking. In advanced MBD, the lizard can no longer lift the trunk, the legs move vigorously, yet the lizard is incapable of ambulation.

Often, reptile keepers will miss some of the first signs of MBD and only realize there is a problem when the animal suddenly seems to have a lame leg or broken toes. Metabolic bone disease often makes the bones weak, brittle and spongy. Normal activities like climbing or jumping and landing hard on an object could cause a broken bone very easily in an animal with MBD.

Lameness, or reluctance to move, can result from single or multiple fractures. In iguanas, fractures are seen frequently in the proximal to midshaft femur (thigh), midshaft humerus (upper arm), distal radius (lower inside arm), and ulna (outer lower arm), and less commonly on the tibiotarsus. Distal radial and ulnar fractures can form a false joint and shift weight-bearing well proximal from the front foot. A single fracture, with or without a history of trauma, should always arouse suspicion of MBD.

Fibrous osteodystrophy generally affects the long bones or the jawbones. Often the underlying bone is fractured but stable. Superficially, the long bones look well-fleshed, even robust. However, with palpitation, the legs have a firm feel more reminiscent of bone than flesh. Fibrous osteodystrophy does not affect all bones equally or symmetrically.

Kyphosis (hump in spine), lordosis (forward curvature of the lower spine), and scoliosis (curvature or rotation of the spine- laterally) are less common and occasionally cause rear limb paresis (slight paralysis). Paresis generally improves with treatment, paralysis is a less common sequela.

Generally, there is a gradual decline in appetite and weight loss. If the jawbones are affected, the patient may want to eat but has difficulty doing so. Lack of growth or weight gain in growing lizards is another indication of MBD.

Radiographs are not essential for diagnosis but are useful to assess fractures, confirm suspicion of MBD, and serve as a basis for subsequent evaluation of the progress of therapy. Radiographically, there is an overall decrease in bone density. Poor bone contrast from soft tissue is especially notable in the pelvis and transverse processes of the caudal vertebrae. In truly severe cases, there may be little definition between bone and soft tissue.

Link



04/11/08  03:56pm

 #1699125


Kowiiya
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  Message To: Cphill58   In reference to Message Id: 1699095


 HELP, ODD BUMP??

I dont think its MBD, I supplement her food often and shes a good eater, never twitches in any funy ways (My roomies BD had MBD I know what the twitching looks like) and is active as ever.



04/11/08  04:07pm

 #1699134


Yexalen
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  Message To: Kowiiya   In reference to Message Id: 1699125


 HELP, ODD BUMP??

call me blind but I am not noticing the bump..... Could it have been an old break from when younger....?



04/11/08  04:10pm

 #1699138


Pocochu
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  Message To: Kowiiya   In reference to Message Id: 1699066


 HELP, ODD BUMP??

Looks to me after enlarging the pic that it might be an old injury to the pelvic bone...Maybe broke at one time and healed up a little deformed...To make really sure you can take her to a vet and have an xray done to find out...Just keep her on a good calcium diet..but don’t over do it.....

She is a cute little one..I just LOVE babies....too bad they have to grow up



04/11/08  04:13pm

 #1699143


Kowiiya
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  Message To: Yexalen   In reference to Message Id: 1699134


 HELP, ODD BUMP??

yea, shes so small and manipulating a cam and her without her going for a suicide dive was hard to get a good angle--Im thinking it was a break, or its congenital--thing is she doesnt seem to have any problem moving at all so...yea. Im just curious if anyone has seen smething like this. Isnt she cute though? I swear I just fed her, looked away and listened to some music, not 10 min later all the crickets are gone.



04/11/08  04:15pm

 #1699161


Fuzzra
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  Message To: Kowiiya   In reference to Message Id: 1699143


 HELP, ODD BUMP??

What a sweetie!!! I’m trying to talk hubby into going to the reptile show tomorrow. I would LOVE to have another baby. She’s so CUTE!



04/11/08  04:25pm


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